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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies 2/2019

22-11-2018 | Original Paper

A Naturalistic Study of Child and Family Screen Media and Mobile Device Use

Auteurs: Sarah E. Domoff, Jenny S. Radesky, Kristen Harrison, Hurley Riley, Julie C. Lumeng, Alison L. Miller

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies | Uitgave 2/2019

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Abstract

Parental mediation of screen media (e.g., television, video games) is associated with better outcomes for children. Although much research has examined parental mediation of television (TV), there is a dearth of research examining communication about mobile media (e.g., Smartphones, tablets) in the digital age. This study seeks to identify themes of family communication around media and mobile devices using naturalistic observational methodology. The sample consisted of 21 toddlers (ages 12–24-months old), 31 preschool-age children (3–5 years old), and 23 school-age (10–13 years old) children and their families. Children wore Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) audio recording devices, which recorded vocalizations and other sounds proximal to the child wearing the device in the home environment, as well as audible screen media use. ATLAS.ti was used to transcribe dialogue from the audio recordings that pertained to screen media. Experts from the fields of communication, clinical child psychology, and developmental-behavioral pediatrics independently analyzed the transcripts to identify common themes. Five main themes emerged. First, parental mediation of screen media was primarily restrictive, reactive, and focused on technology functionality. Second, active mediation was child-driven. Third, siblings played a more dominant role in mediation than parents. Fourth, parents and children negotiated screen time limits. Finally, parallel family media use was common. Multiple family members engaged with their own mobile devices while simultaneously being exposed to background screen media (i.e., media multitasking). Assessing media use in the naturalistic home environment elucidated current patterns of family media use and communication about media in the digital age.
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Metagegevens
Titel
A Naturalistic Study of Child and Family Screen Media and Mobile Device Use
Auteurs
Sarah E. Domoff
Jenny S. Radesky
Kristen Harrison
Hurley Riley
Julie C. Lumeng
Alison L. Miller
Publicatiedatum
22-11-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Child and Family Studies / Uitgave 2/2019
Print ISSN: 1062-1024
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2843
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-018-1275-1