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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 6/2012

01-06-2012 | Original Paper

A Lack of Left Visual Field Bias When Individuals with Autism Process Faces

Auteurs: Eva M. Dundas, Catherine A. Best, Nancy J. Minshew, Mark S. Strauss

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders | Uitgave 6/2012

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Abstract

It has been established that typically developing individuals have a bias to attend to facial information in the left visual field (LVF) more than in the right visual field. This bias is thought to arise from the right hemisphere’s advantage for processing facial information, with evidence suggesting it to be driven by the configural demands of face processing. Considering research showing that individuals with autism have impaired face processing abilities, with marked deficits in configural processing, it was hypothesized that they would not demonstrate a LVF bias for faces. Eye-tracking technology was used to show that individuals with autism were not spontaneously biased to facial information in the LVF, in contrast to a control group, while discriminating facial gender.
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Metagegevens
Titel
A Lack of Left Visual Field Bias When Individuals with Autism Process Faces
Auteurs
Eva M. Dundas
Catherine A. Best
Nancy J. Minshew
Mark S. Strauss
Publicatiedatum
01-06-2012
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders / Uitgave 6/2012
Print ISSN: 0162-3257
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3432
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-011-1354-2